Unbrick Google Pixel 2 and Pixel 2 XL and Return to Stock

In this guide, you will learn how to unbrick Google Pixel 2 XL and Pixel 2 and return them completely to stock state. With a lot of custom ROMs and mods being available to the device, it really is easy to brick the Pixel 2 duo. Read ahead to know how to unbrick Pixel 2 [XL] and flash stock firmware.

Google Pixel 2 and Pixel 2 XL are the best from the house Google at the moment. Before the Pixel devices, the Nexus lineup represented the Google’s vision of Android smartphones. The phones were extremely developer friendly and there were always a ton of custom ROMs and MODs available for the devices. Unlocking the Bootloader, Installing TWRP and rooting the devices were pretty straight-forward and easy. Then came the Google Pixel devices. Pixel 2 and Pixel 2 XL are the latest addition to the Pixel Product lineup. If you have bricked you Pixel 2 or Pixel 2 XL and are looking for a way to flash stock firmware and unbrick Pixel 2, we have got just the guide for you.

Pixel 2 Unbrick Guide

With Google’s transition from Nexus to Pixel, a lot of changes came into existence. Google has started to concentrate more and more on the device security, which is a good thing. There were also some recent changes which saw the transition to dual partition system (a/b partitions). All these factors have made the life of Pixel 2 developers a bit more complex.

The development of Pixel 2 and Pixel 2 XL might have slowed down in the beginning but everything comes back on track on we get to install TWRP and root the devices. If you have recently decided to try one of the custom ROMs or MODs and have bricked your Pixel 2, this tutorial is the one you are looking for. Read ahead to know how to unbrick Pixel 2.

Prerequisites

Download Pixel 2 and Pixel 2 XL Stock Firmware

Steps to Unbrick Pixel 2 and Pixel 2 XL

  1. Make sure you have read the prerequisites section carefully.
  2. Make sure you have downloaded the system images appropriate to your device.
  3. Extract the system images inside the folder where ADB and Fastboot are installed.
  4. Reboot your device into Fastboot mode:
    • Switch off your device.
    • Wait for a couple of seconds to make sure your Pixel 2 is completely turned off.
    • Next, press and hold the Power button and the Volume Down button at the same time till you enter the fastboot mode.
  5. Connect your Pixel 2 to your PC via USB cable.
  6. Open a command prompt from inside the folder where ADB and Fastboot are installed.
    ⇒ Hold Down Shift Key > Right click on the empty space inside the folder and select ‘Open Command Window here’ or ‘Open PowerShell Window here’ option.Open-Command-Prompt
  7. Execute the following command in the command prompt:
    flash-all.bat
  8. Wait for the above script to complete.
  9. Once the process is finished, the phone will reboot itself.
  10. Unplug the device from the PC and proceed with the normal Android Setup process.

Congratulations, you have successfully flashed stock firmware on your Pixel 2. This is the easiest way to unbrick Pixel 2 and return it to complete stock firmware.

6 thoughts on “Unbrick Google Pixel 2 and Pixel 2 XL and Return to Stock

  1. This is completely inaccurate. If a device is “bricked” it wont function, get into bootloader mode, or even turn on. This is how you fix a soft brick, or a hiccup so to speak.

    • Agree fully.
      My cousin has the Pixel 2 which went into an error state where you can’t get into the bootloader. I tried everything I could but no luck. She had to send it back to Google. Apparently they will be sending her a new one soon.

      Maybe I could do something if it was unlocked but I don’t see much point in unlocking a Pixel. My own Pixel 2 XL is staying stock.

    • I have bricked my Nexus 6P and OnePlus 3 several times, but bootloader have always been accessible. The device wouldn’t boot normally (meaning – wouldn’t boot into OS) and will end up in bootloop or sometimes will end up getting stuck on the OEM Splash logo. Bootloader has always been the life saver in all those cases. May be my experience has been different? I have never been in a situation where bootloader was inaccessible. But, I do get your point!

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